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Authors - C

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

Tom Cabot

John Cacioppo (with William Patrick)

Deborah Cadbury

Alice Calaprice

Nigel Calder

Nigel Calder (with Henrik Svensmark)

Paul Callaghan (with Kim Hill)

Paul Callaghan (with Bill Manhire)

Craig Callender (with Ralph Edney)

Deborah Cameron

Fritjof Capra

Nessa Carey

Robert Cargill

Bernard Carlson 

Brian Carpenter

Michael Carroll

Sean Carroll

Richard Carter

Rita Carter

Stephen Cass (with Kevin Grazier)

Tom Cassidy (with Thomas Byrne)

Brian Cathcart

Jack Challoner

Jack Challoner (with John Perry)

Nicholas Cheetham

Margaret Cheney

Eugenia Cheng

Marcus Chown

Marcus Chown (with Govert Schilling)

Brian Christian

Brian Christian (with Tom Griffiths)

Robert Cialdini (with Noah Goldstein & Steve Martin)

John Clancy

Stuart Clark

David Clarke

Brian Clegg 

Brian Clegg (with Oliver Pugh)

Brian Clegg (with Rhodri Evans)

Raymond Clemens (ed.)

Daniel Clery

Frank Close

I. B. Cohen

Jack Cohen (with Ian Stewart and Terry Pratchett)

Richard Cohen

Peter Coles

Harry Collins

Robert Colvile

Neil Comins

Joseph Conlon

Mariana Cook

Nancy Cooke (with Margaret Hilton) Eds.

Ashley Cooper

Henry Cooper

Jennifer Coopersmith

Jack Copeland

David Corcoran (Ed.)

Charles Cotton (with Kate Kirk)

Heather Couper (with Nigel Henbest)

Brian Cox (with Jeff Forshaw)

Daniel Coyle

Jerry Coyne

Naomi Craft

Catherine Craig (with Leslie Brunetta)

Robert Crease

Robert Crease (with Alfred Scarf Goldhaber)

Ian Crofton

Alfred Crosby

John Croucher (with Rosalind Croucher)

Rosalind Croucher (with John Croucher)

Vilmos Csányi

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