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Authors - B

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z


Paul Bader (with Adam Hart-Davis)

Jim Baggott

Gregory Baker

Joanne Baker

Hartosh Singh Bal (with Gaurav Suri)

Jonathan Balcombe

Sebastien Balibar

Brian Ball

Johnny Ball

Keith Ball

Philip Ball

Iain Banks

David Barash

Tom Barnes et al.

Cynthia Barnett

Simon Baron-Cohen

John Barrow

Anthony Barnosky

Craig Bauer

Robert Bauval

Robert Bauval (with Thomas Brophy)

Norman Beale

Randy Beikmann

Alex Bellos (with Edmund Harriss)

Arthur Benjamin

Arthur Benjamin (with Michael Shermer)

Jeffrey Bennett

Nigel Benson 

Nigel Benson (with Boris van Loon)

Peter Bentley

Alain Berthoz

Michael Bess

Colin Beveridge

James  Binney

Piers Bizony

Sandra Blakeslee (with V. S. Ramachandran)

Michael Blastland (with Andrew Dilnot)

Paul Bloom

Mark Blumberg

Katherine Blundell

Stephen Blundell

David Bodanis

Alex Boese

David Bohm

Martin Bojowald

B J Booth

Nick Bostrom

Peter Bowler

Stephen Bown

David Bradley

Mark Brake (with Neil Hook)

Uri Bram

Loretta Graziano Breuning

Dennis Brian

Jean Bricmont

Henry Brighton (with Howard Selina)

William Brock

Wally Broecker (with Charles Langmuir)

Clive Bromhall

Michael Brooks

Michael Brooks (with Rick Edwards)

Thomas Brophy (with Robert Bauval)

Michael Brotherton (ed.)

Andrew Brown

Brandon Brown

Guy Brown

Matt Brown

Paul Brown

Richard Brown

Janet Browne

Leslie Brunetta (with Catherine Craig)

John Brunner

Kimberley Bruno (with Christopher Gerry)

Bill Bryson

Allen Buchanan

Mark Buchanan

Jed Buchwald (with Diane Greco Josefowicz)

Dean Buonomano

Druin Burch

Edward Burger (with Michael Starbird)

Robbins Burling

Dean Burnett

Mathieu Burniat (with Thibault Damour)

William Byers

William Bynum

William Bynum (with Roy Porter)

Peter Byrne 

Thomas Byrne (with Tom Cassidy)

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